SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-QSB

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE
SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the Quarterly period ended   March 31, 2008

Commission File No. 000-53012

MEDICAL BILLING ASSISTANCE, INC.
 (Exact Name of Small Business Issuer as specified in its charter)


      Colorado
59-2851601
(State or other jurisdiction
(IRS Employer File Number)
of incorporation)
 

   
16325 East Dorado Ave.
 
Centennial , Colorado
80111
(Address of principal executive offices)
(zip code)

 (303) 667-6411
 (Registrant's telephone number, including area code)


Check whether the issuer: (1) filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act during the past 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports); and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes [X]  No [ ]

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act)     Yes [ ]    No [X]

As of May 1, 2008, registrant had outstanding 9,596,000 shares of the registrant’s common stock.  The securities of this Company do not trade in a public market.

Transitional Small Business Disclosure Format (check one):  Yes [ ]    No [X]


 

 

FORM 10-QSB

Medical Billing Assistance, Inc.

TABLE OF CONTENTS


PART I  FINANCIAL INFORMATION
 
 
Item 1. Financial Statements for the period ended March 31, 2008
 
          Consolidated Balance Sheet (Unaudited)
  4
          Consolidated Statements of Operations (Unaudited)
  5
          Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows (Unaudited)
  6
           Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
  8
   
Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis and Plan of Operation
 10
   
Item 3. Controls and Procedures
 20
   
PART II  OTHER INFORMATION
 
   
  Item 1. Legal Proceedings
 20
  Item 2. Changes in Securities
  20
  Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities
  20
  Item 4. Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders
  20
  Item 5. Other Information
  20
  Item 6. Exhibits and Reports on Form 8-K
  20
   
Signatures
 21
   
 

 
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PART I  FINANCIAL INFORMATION

For purposes of this document, unless otherwise indicated or the context otherwise requires, all references herein to “Medical Billing Assistance” “we,” “us,” and “our,” refer to Medical Billing Assistance, Inc., a Colorado corporation and our wholly-owned subsidiary, I.V. Services Ltd., Inc.
 

ITEM 1.  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS



MEDICAL BILLING ASSISTANCE, INC.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

Quarter Ended March 31, 2008
 




 
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MEDICAL BILLING ASSISTANCE, INC.
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
(Unaudited)

   
Mar. 31, 2008
 
ASSETS
     
       
Current assets
     
      Cash
  $ 3,065  
             Total current assets
    3,065  
         
Total Assets
  $ 3,065  
         
LIABILITIES &
       
   STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY
       
         
Current liabilities
       
      Accrued payables
  $ 116  
      Related party payables
    41,449  
      Notes payable
    22,108  
          Total current liabilties
    63,673  
         
Total Liabilities
    63,673  
         
Stockholders' Equity
       
      Preferred stock, $.01 par value;
       
          1,000,000 shares authorized;
       
          no shares issued and outstanding
    -  
      Common stock, $.001 par value;
       
          50,000,000 shares authorized;
       
          9,596,000 shares issued and outstanding
    9,596  
      Additional paid in capital
    20,956  
      Accumulated deficit
    (91,160 )
         
Total Stockholders' Equity
    (60,608 )
         
Total Liabilities and Stockholders' Equity
  $ 3,065  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.

 
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MEDICAL BILLING ASSISTANCE, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
(Unaudited)

   
Three Months
   
Three Months
 
   
Ended
   
Ended
 
   
Mar. 31, 2007
   
Mar. 31, 2008
 
             
             
Revenue
  $ -     $ -  
                 
Operating expenses:
               
     General and administrative
    86       8,519  
      86       8,519  
                 
Gain (loss) from operations
    (86 )     (8,519 )
                 
Other income (expense):
               
     Interest expense
    (441 )     (364 )
                 
Income (loss) before
               
     provision for income taxes
    (527 )     (8,883 )
                 
Provision for income tax
    -       -  
                 
Net income (loss)
  $ (527 )   $ (8,883 )
                 
Net income (loss) per share
               
(Basic and fully diluted)
  $ (0.00 )   $ (0.00 )
                 
Weighted average number of
               
common shares outstanding
    8,000,000       9,596,000  
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.

 
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MEDICAL BILLING ASSISTANCE, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(Unaudited)


   
Three Months
   
Three Months
 
   
Ended
   
Ended
 
   
Mar. 31, 2007
   
Mar. 31, 2008
 
Cash Flows From Operating Activities:
           
     Net income (loss)
  $ (527 )   $ (8,883 )
                 
     Adjustments to reconcile net loss to
               
     net cash provided by (used for)
               
     operating activities:
               
          Accrued payables
    (71 )     (33 )
          Related party payables
    750       900  
               Net cash provided by (used for)
               
               operating activities
    152       (8,016 )
                 
                 
Cash Flows From Investing Activities:
               
      -       -  
               Net cash provided by (used for)
               
               investing activities
    -       -  


(Continued On Following Page)

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.

 
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MEDICAL BILLING ASSISTANCE, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
 (Unaudited)

(Continued From Previous Page)

   
Three Months
   
Three Months
 
   
Ended
   
Ended
 
   
Mar. 31, 2007
   
Mar. 31, 2008
 
             
Cash Flows From Financing Activities:
           
         Notes payable - payments
    (238 )     (370 )
         Sales of common stock
               
         Paid in capital
               
               Net cash provided by (used for)
               
               financing activities
    (238 )     (370 )
                 
Net Increase (Decrease) In Cash
    (86 )     (8,386 )
                 
Cash At The Beginning Of The Period
    230       11,451  
                 
Cash At The End Of The Period
  $ 144     $ 3,065  
                 
                 
Schedule Of Non-Cash Investing And Financing Activities
         
                 
None
               
                 
Supplemental Disclosure
               
                 
Cash paid for interest
  $ 512     $ 396  
Cash paid for income taxes
  $ -     $ -  
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.

 
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MEDICAL BILLING ASSISTANCE, INC.
NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)


NOTE 1. ORGANIZATION, OPERATIONS AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES:

Medical Billing Assistance, Inc. (the “Company”), was incorporated in the State of Colorado on May 30, 2007. The Company was formed to act as a holding corporation for I.V. Services Ltd., Inc., a Florida corporation engaged in providing billing services to the medical community. The Company may also engage in any other business permitted by law, as designated by the Board of Directors of the Company. I.V. Services Ltd., Inc. was incorporated in the State of Florida on September 28, 1987.

Basis of Presentation

The accompanying unaudited financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the instructions to Form 10-QSB and do not include all of the information and disclosures required by generally accepted accounting principles for complete financial statements. All adjustments which are, in the opinion of management, necessary for a fair presentation of the results of operations for the interim periods have been made and are of a recurring nature unless otherwise disclosed herein. The results of operations for such interim periods are not necessarily indicative of operations for a full year.

Principles of consolidation

The accompanying consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Medical Billing Assistance, Inc. and its wholly owned subsidiary. All intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

Cash and cash equivalents

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less as cash equivalents.

Accounts receivable

The Company reviews accounts receivable periodically for collectability and establishes an allowance for doubtful accounts and records bad debt expense when deemed necessary. At March 31, 2008 the Company had no balance in its allowance for doubtful accounts.

Property and equipment

Property and equipment are recorded at cost and depreciated under accelerated methods over each item's estimated useful life, which is five years for vehicles, computers and other items.

 
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MEDICAL BILLING ASSISTANCE, INC.
NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

NOTE 1. ORGANIZATION, OPERATIONS AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued):

Revenue recognition

Revenue is recognized on an accrual basis after services have been performed under contract terms, the event price to the client is fixed or determinable, and collectibility is reasonably assured. Standard contract policy calls for partial payment up front with balance due upon receipt of final billing.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Income tax

The Company accounts for income taxes under Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 109 (“SFAS 109”). Under SFAS 109 deferred taxes are provided on a liability method whereby deferred tax assets are recognized for deductible temporary differences and operating loss carryforwards and deferred tax liabilities are recognized for taxable temporary differences. Temporary differences are the differences between the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and their tax bases. Deferred tax assets are reduced by a valuation allowance when, in the opinion of management, it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are adjusted for the effects of changes in tax laws and rates on the date of enactment.

Net income (loss) per share

The net income (loss) per share is computed by dividing the net income (loss) by the weighted average number of shares of common outstanding. Warrants, stock options, and common stock issuable upon the conversion of the Company's preferred stock (if any), are not included in the computation if the effect would be anti-dilutive and would increase the earnings or decrease loss per share.

Financial Instruments

The carrying value of the Company’s financial instruments, including cash and cash equivalents and accrued payables, as reported in the accompanying balance sheet, approximates fair value.

 
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ITEM 2.     MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS AND PLAN OF OPERATION

The following discussion of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with, and is qualified in its entirety by, the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in, Item 1 in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-QSB. This item contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. Actual results may differ materially from those indicated in such forward-looking statements.

Forward-Looking Statements
 
This Quarterly Report on Form 10-QSB and the documents incorporated herein by reference contain forward-looking statements.  Such forward-looking statements are based on current expectations, estimates, and projections about our industry, management beliefs, and certain assumptions made by our management.  Words such as “anticipates”, “expects”, “intends”, “plans”, “believes”, “seeks”, “estimates”, variations of such words, and similar expressions are intended to identify such forward-looking statements.  These statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to certain risks, uncertainties, and assumptions that are difficult to predict; therefore, actual results may differ materially from those expressed or forecasted in any such forward-looking statements.  Unless required by law, we undertake no obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events, or otherwise.  However, readers should carefully review the risk factors set forth herein and in other reports and documents that we file from time to time with the Securities and Exchange Commission, particularly the Annual Reports on Form 10-KSB, Quarterly reports on Form 10-QSB and any Current Reports on Form 8-K.
 
Risk Factors
 
You should carefully consider the risks and uncertainties described below; and all of the other information included in this document. Any of the following risks could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition or operating results and could negatively impact the value of your investment.
 
The occurrence of any of the following risks could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and operating result. In this case, the trading price of our common stock could decline and you might lose all or part of your investment.

RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH OUR COMPANY:

We are recently formed, have no substantial operating history in our present format, and have never been profitable.  We have negative stockholders equity.

Our parent company formed as a Colorado business entity in May 2007. At the present time, we have not engaged in any substantial business activity. Our subsidiary has had operations since 1994 but has never been profitable. We cannot say that we have a successful operating history. There can be no guarantee that we will ever be profitable.  On March 31, 2008, we had a  negative stockholders equity of $60,608.
 
 
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Because we had incurred operating losses from our inception, our accountants have expressed doubts about our ability to continue as a going concern.
 
For the fiscal years ended December 31, 2006 and 2007, our accountants have expressed doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern as a result of our continued net losses. Our ability to achieve and maintain profitability and positive cash flow is dependent upon:
 
  our ability to begin substantial operations;
 
  our ability to locate clients who will purchase our services; and
 
  our ability to generate revenues.
 
 Based upon current plans, we may incur operating losses in future periods because we may, from time to time, be incurring expenses but not generating sufficient revenues. We expect approximately $35,000 in operating costs over the next twelve months. We cannot guarantee that we will be successful in generating sufficient revenues or other funds in the future to cover these operating costs. Failure to generate sufficient revenues will cause us to go out of business.

Our limited operating history in our present format makes it difficult for us to evaluate our future business prospects and make decisions based on those estimates of our future performance.

The concept for our business model was developed in 1994. However, we only created our holding company in 2007. We have operated as a corporation in this present format for short amount of time. We have never developed substantial revenue. We believe that we have a limited operating history, based upon no revenues and a lack of profitability. These factors make it difficult to evaluate our business on the basis of historical operations. As a consequence, our past results may not be indicative of future results. Although this is true for any business, it is particularly true for us because of our limited operating history. Reliance on historical results may hinder our ability to anticipate and timely adapt to increases or decreases in sales, revenues or expenses. For example, if we overestimate our future sales for a particular period or periods based on our historical growth rate, we may increase our overhead and other operating expenses to a greater degree than we would have if we correctly anticipated the lower sales level for that period and reduced our controllable expenses accordingly. If we make poor budgetary decisions as a result of unreliable historical data, we could continue to incur losses, which may result in a decline in our stock price.
 
We have no experience as a public company.

We have never operated as a public company. We have no experience in complying with the various rules and regulations, which are required of a public company. As a result, we may not be able to operate successfully as a public company, even if our operations are successful. We plan to comply with all of the various rules and regulations, which are required of a public company. However, if we cannot operate successfully as a public company, your investment may be materially adversely affected. Our inability to operate as a public company could be the basis of your losing your entire investment in us.


 
- 11 -

 

We are implementing a strategy to grow our business, which is expensive and may not generate increases in our revenues.

We intend to grow our business, and we plan to incur expenses associated with our growth and expansion. Although we recently raised funds through offerings to implement our growth strategy, these funds may not be adequate to offset all of the expenses we incur in expanding our business. We will need to generate revenues to offset expenses associated with our growth, and we may be unsuccessful in achieving revenues, despite our attempts to grow our business. If our growth strategies do not result in significant revenues, we may have to abandon our plans for further growth or may even cease our proposed operations.

We must effectively manage the growth of our operations, or we may outgrow our current infrastructure.

As of March 31, 2008, we had one employee, our President. If we experience rapid growth of our operations, we could see a backlog of client projects. We can resolve these capacity issues by hiring additional personnel and upgrading our infrastructure. However, we cannot guarantee that sufficient additional personnel will be available or that we will find suitable technology to aid our growth. In any case, we will continue pursuing additional sales growth for our company. Expanding our infrastructure will be expensive, and will require us to train our workforce, and improve our financial and managerial controls to keep pace with the growth of our operations.

We have a lack of liquidity and will need additional financing in the future. Additional financing may not be available when needed, which could delay our development or indefinitely postponed.

We are only minimally capitalized. Because we are only minimally capitalized, we expect to experience a lack of liquidity for the foreseeable future in our proposed operations. We will adjust our expenses as necessary to prevent cash flow or liquidity problems. However, we expect we will need additional financing of some type, which we do not now possess, to fully develop our operations. We expect to rely principally upon our ability to raise additional financing, the success of which cannot be guaranteed. We will look at both equity and debt financing, including loans from our principal shareholder. However, at the present time, we have no definitive plans for financing in place, other than the funds, which may be loaned to us by Mr. West, our President. In the event that we need additional capital, Mr. West has agreed to loan such funds as may be necessary through December 31, 2008 for working capital purposes. To the extent that we experience a substantial lack of liquidity, our development in accordance with our proposed plan may be delayed or indefinitely postponed, our operations could be impaired, we may never become profitable, fail as an organization, and our investors could lose some or all of their investment.

As a company with limited operating history in this format, we are inherently a risky investment.

We have limited operating history in this format. Because we are a company with limited operating history, the operations in which we engage in should be seen as an extremely risky business. An investor could lose his entire investment.
 
There are factors beyond our control, which may adversely affect us.

Our operations may also be affected by factors, which are beyond our control, principally general market conditions and changing client preferences.  Any of these problems, or a combination thereof, could have affect on our viability as an entity. We may never become profitable, fail as an organization, and our investors could lose some or all of their investment.

 
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Our ability to grow our business depends on relationships with others. We have no established relationships at this time.  We may never develop such relationships. Further, if we were to lose those relationships, we could lose our ability to sell our services.
 
Most of our revenue and a majority of our gross profit are expected to come from selling our billing services to DME companies. While our relationships will change from time to time, we must rely upon DME companies for the services we plan to sell. At the present time, we do not have any DME companies as clients and cannot guarantee we will ever develop any such clients. If we do develop such clients, we risk that a given client will change its marketing strategy and de-emphasize its use of our services. Our ability to generate revenue from selling our services would diminish and our operations and results of operations would be materially and adversely affected.
 
We are a relatively small company with limited resources compared to some of our current and potential competitors, which may hinder our ability to compete effectively.
 
All of our current and potential competitors have longer operating histories, significantly greater resources, broader name recognition, and a larger installed base of clients than we have. As a result, these competitors may have greater credibility with our existing and potential clients. They also may be able to adopt more aggressive pricing policies and devote greater resources to the development, promotion and sale of their services than we can to ours, which would allow them to respond more quickly than us to new or emerging technologies or changes in client requirements. In addition, some of our current and potential competitors have already established relationships with decision makers at our potential clients.
  
We may be unable to hire and retain key personnel.
 
Our future success depends on our ability to attract qualified personnel. We may be unable to attract these necessary personnel. If we fail to attract or retain skilled employees, or if a key employee fails to perform in his or her current position, we may be unable to generate sufficient revenue to offset our operating costs.

We may need to substantially invest in marketing efforts in order to grow our business, which will be expensive.

In order to grow our business, we will need to develop and maintain widespread recognition and acceptance of our company, our business model, and our services. We have not presented our service offering to the potential market. We plan to rely primarily on word of mouth from our existing contacts we develop personally through industry events to promote and market ourselves. In order to successfully grow our company, we may need to significantly increase our financial commitment to creating awareness and acceptance of our company, which would be expensive. To date, marketing and advertising expenses have been negligible. If we fail to successfully market and promote our business, we could lose potential clients to our competitors, or our growth efforts may be ineffective. If we incur significant expenses promoting and marketing ourselves, it could delay or completely forestall our profitability.

Our business is not diversified, which could result in significant fluctuations in our operating results.

All of our business is involved in the marketing of selling our billing services to DME companies, and, accordingly, is dependent upon trends in the sector. Downturns in the integrated data storage solutions sector could have a material adverse effect on our business. A downturn in selling our billing services sector may reduce our stock price, even if our business is successful.

 
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Our success will be dependent upon our management’s efforts. We cannot sustain profitability without the efforts of our management.

Our success will be dependent upon the decision making of our directors and executive officers. These individuals intend to commit as much time as necessary to our business, but this commitment is no assurance of success. The loss of any or all of these individuals, particularly Mr. Michael J. West, our President, could have a material, adverse impact on our operations. We have no written employment agreements with any officers and directors, including Mr. West. We have not obtained key man life insurance on the lives of any of our officers or directors.

Our stock has no public trading market and there is no guarantee a trading market will ever develop for our securities.

There has been, and continues to be, no public market for our common stock. An active trading market for our shares has not, and may never develop or be sustained. If you purchase shares of common stock, you may not be able to resell those shares at or above the initial price you paid. The market price of our common stock may fluctuate significantly in response to numerous factors, some of which are beyond our control, including the following:

·  
actual or anticipated fluctuations in our operating results;

·  
changes in financial estimates by securities analysts or our failure to perform in line with such estimates;

·  
changes in market valuations of other companies, particularly those that market services such as ours;

·  
announcements by us or our competitors of significant innovations,  acquisitions, strategic partnerships, joint ventures or  capital commitments;

·  
introduction of enhancements that reduce the need for our services;

·  
departures of key personnel.

Of our total outstanding shares as of March 31, 2008, a total of 8,000,000, or approximately 83.4%, will be restricted from immediate resale but may be sold into the market in the near future. This could cause the market price of our common stock to drop significantly, even if our business is doing well.

As restrictions on resale end, the market price of our stock could drop significantly if the holders of restricted shares sell them or are perceived by the market as intending to sell them.


 
- 14 -

 

Applicable SEC rules governing the trading of “Penny Stocks” limits the liquidity of our common stock, which may affect the trading price of our common stock.
 
Our common stock is currently not quoted on in any market. If our common stock becomes quoted, we anticipate that it will trade well below $5.00 per share. As a result, our common stock is considered a “penny stock” and is subject to SEC rules and regulations that impose limitations upon the manner in which our shares can be publicly traded.  These regulations require the delivery, prior to any transaction involving a penny stock, of a disclosure schedule explaining the penny stock and the associated risks.  Under these regulations, certain brokers who recommend such securities to persons other than established customers or certain accredited investors must make a special written suitability determination for the purchaser and receive the written purchaser’s agreement to a transaction prior to purchase.  These regulations have the effect of limiting the trading activity of our common stock and reducing the liquidity of an investment in our common stock

The over-the-counter market for stock such as ours is subject to extreme price and volume fluctuations.

The securities of companies such as ours have historically experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations during certain periods. These broad market fluctuations and other factors, such as new developments and trends in the our industry and in the investment markets generally, as well as economic conditions and quarterly variations in our operational results, may have a negative effect on the market price of our common stock.

Buying low-priced penny stocks is very risky and speculative.

The shares being offered are defined as a penny stock under the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, and rules of the Commission. The Exchange Act and such penny stock rules generally impose additional sales practice and disclosure requirements on broker-dealers who sell our securities to persons other than certain accredited investors who are, generally, institutions with assets in excess of $5,000,000 or individuals with net worth in excess of $1,000,000 or annual income exceeding $200,000, or $300,000 jointly with spouse, or in transactions not recommended by the broker-dealer. For transactions covered by the penny stock rules, a broker-dealer must make a suitability determination for each purchaser and receive the purchaser's written agreement prior to the sale. In addition, the broker-dealer must make certain mandated disclosures in penny stock transactions, including the actual sale or purchase price and actual bid and offer quotations, the compensation to be received by the broker-dealer and certain associated persons, and deliver certain disclosures required by the Commission. Consequently, the penny stock rules may affect the ability of broker-dealers to make a market in or trade our common stock and may also affect your ability to resell any shares you may purchase in the public markets.

We do not expect to pay dividends on common stock.

We have not paid any cash dividends with respect to our common stock, and it is unlikely that we will pay any dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future. Earnings, if any, that we may realize will be retained in the business for further development and expansion.

 
- 15 -

 
 
Overview and History
 
Our primary business goal is to provide medical billing assistance to durable medical equipment companies (“DME”). A DME is a company, which sells or rents durable medical equipment to patients for use in their homes. Our plan is to help DME companies comply with constantly changing billing and documentation requirements thrust upon them by Medicare, Medicaid and Private Health Insurance Companies.  With our assistance, we believe that DME companies will have the opportunity to improve accuracy, completeness, and efficiency in record keeping resulting in a more rapid turn around for insurance claims they submit for services provided, with the result of fewer claim denials and, potentially, a significant improvement in their cash flow.

Our primary focus will be DME companies throughout the United States. We do not currently have any plans for expansion into other areas of business. At the present time, we have no active operations and are developing our business plan. We plan to sell our services to small and medium-sized business clients. At the present time, we have no plans to raise any additional funds within the next twelve months, other than those raised in our recent private offering. Any working capital will be generated from internal operations or from funds, which may be loaned to us by Mr. West, our President. In the event that we need additional capital, Mr. West has agreed to loan such funds as may be necessary through December 31, 2008 for working capital purposes. However, we reserve the right to examine possible additional sources of funds, including, but not limited to, equity or debt offerings, borrowings, or joint ventures. No market surveys have ever been conducted to determine demand for our services. Therefore, there can be no assurance that any of our objectives will be achieved.

Our parent company was incorporated in the State of Colorado on May 30, 2007 to act as a holding corporation for I.V. Services Ltd., Inc., a Florida corporation engaged in providing billing services to the medical community. I.V. Services Ltd., Inc. was incorporated in the State of Florida on September 28, 1987.

Our principal effort at this time will be to begin developing a client base. Initially, we expect to rely heavily on the experience and business relationships of our principal officer.  Mr. West has developed numerous business relationships with other medical equipment companies over the years and we expect those relationships will result in our initial business clients. We believe that we will be able to develop significant customer loyalty based on the overall improvement our clients will see in their accounts receivables and turn around time in their claims processing.  Satisfied clients will also result in referrals of other new clients.

We are comprised of one corporation with one wholly owned subsidiary, I. V. Services Ltd., Inc.(IVS). All of our operations are conducted through this corporation. IVS was established September 28, 1987 as a Florida Corporation.

We have not been subject to any bankruptcy, receivership or similar proceeding.
 
Our address is 16325 East Dorado Ave., Centennial, CO 80111.  Our telephone number is (303) 667-6411.
 
Results of Operations
 
The following discussion involves our results of operations for the quarters ending March 31, 2008 and March 31, 2007.

 
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Our accountants have expressed doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern as a result of our history of net loss. Our ability to achieve and maintain profitability and positive cash flow is dependent upon our ability to successfully develop a consulting practice with regard to providing medical billing assistance to durable medical equipment companies and our ability to generate revenues.

Comparing our operations, we had no revenues for the three months ended March 31, 2008 or for the three months ended March 31, 2007.

Operating expenses, which consists only of general and administrative expenses for the three months ended March 31, 2008 was $8,519. This compares to operating expenses for the three months ended March 31, 2007 of $86. The major component of operating expenses were professional fees.

Because we do not pay salaries, and our major professional fees have been paid for the year, operating expenses are expected to remain fairly constant.

We had a net loss of $8,883 for the three months ended March 31, 2008. This compares with a net loss of $527 for the three months ended March 31, 2007.

To try to operate at a break-even level based upon our current level of proposed business activity, we believe that we must generate approximately $35,000 in revenue per year. However, if our forecasts are inaccurate, we will need to raise additional funds. In the event that we need additional capital, Mr. West has agreed to loan such funds as may be necessary through December 31, 2008 for working capital purposes.

On the other hand, we may choose to scale back our operations to operate at break-even with a smaller level of business activity, while adjusting our overhead to meet the revenue from current operations. In addition, we expect that we will need to raise additional funds if we decide to pursue more rapid expansion, the development of new or enhanced services or products, appropriate responses to competitive pressures, or the acquisition of complementary businesses or technologies, or if we must respond to unanticipated events that require us to make additional investments. We cannot assure that additional financing will be available when needed on favorable terms, or at all.

We expect to incur operating losses in future periods because we will be incurring expenses and not generating sufficient revenues. We expect approximately $35,000 in operating costs over the next twelve months. We cannot guarantee that we will be successful in generating sufficient revenues or other funds in the future to cover these operating costs. Failure to generate sufficient revenues or additional financing when needed could cause us to go out of business.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

As of March 31, 2008, we had cash or cash equivalents of $3,065.

Net cash used for operating activities was $8,016 for the period ended March 31, 2008, compared to cash provided for operating activities of $152 for the period ended March 31, 2007.

Cash flows used or provided by investing activities were $-0-for both periods.

Cash flows used or provided by financing activities were $370 for the period ended March 31, 2008, compared to cash provided for operating activities of $238 for the period ended March 31, 2007.


 
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Over the next twelve months we do not expect any material our capital costs to develop operations. We plan to buy office equipment to be used in our operations.

We believe that we have sufficient capital in the short term for our current level of operations. This is because we believe that we can attract sufficient sales within our present organizational structure and resources to become profitable in our operations. Additional resources would be needed to expand into additional locations, which we have no plans to do at this time. We do not anticipate needing to raise additional capital resources in the next twelve months In the event that we need additional capital, Mr. West has agreed to loan such funds as may be necessary through December 31, 2008 for working capital purposes.

Our principal source of liquidity will be our operations. We expect variation in revenues to account for the difference between a profit and a loss. Also business activity is closely tied to the U.S. economy. Our ability to achieve and maintain profitability and positive cash flow is dependent upon our ability to successfully develop a management consulting practice with regard to accounting, computer and general business issues for small and home-office based companies and our ability to generate revenues.
 
In any case, we try to operate with minimal overhead. Our primary activity will be to seek to develop clients for our services and, consequently, our sales. If we succeed in developing clients for our services and generating sufficient sales, we will become profitable. We cannot guarantee that this will ever occur. Our plan is to build our company in any manner, which will be successful.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

We have no off-balance sheet arrangements with any party.

Plan of Operation.

Our plan for the twelve months beginning January 1, 2008 is to operate at a profit or at break even. Our plan is to attract sufficient additional sales within our present organizational structure and resources to become profitable in our operations.

Currently, we are conducting business in only one location within the Denver Metropolitan area. We have no plans to expand into other locations or areas. The timing of the completion of the milestones needed to become profitable is not directly dependent on anything except our ability to develop sufficient revenues. We believe that we can achieve profitability as we are presently organized with sufficient business. Our principal cost will be marketing our services. At this point, we do not know the scope of our potential marketing costs but will use our existing resources to market our services. Our resources consist of our available cash and advances from Mr. West, who has agreed to loan such funds as may be necessary through December 31, 2008 for working capital purposes.

If we are not successful in our operations we will be faced with several options:

1.
Cease operations and go out of business;

2.
Continue to seek alternative and acceptable sources of capital;

3.
Bring in additional capital that may result in a change of control; or
 
4.
Identify a candidate for acquisition that seeks access to the public marketplace and its financing sources
 
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Currently, we believe that we have sufficient capital to implement our proposed business operations or to sustain them through December 31, 2008. If we can become profitable, we could operate at our present level indefinitely. To date, we have never had any discussions with any possible acquisition candidate nor have we any intention of doing so.

Proposed Milestones to Implement Business Operations
 
At the present time, we plan to operate from one location in the Denver Metropolitan area. Our plan is to make our operation profitable by the end of our next fiscal year. We estimate that we must generate approximately $35,000 in sales per year to be profitable.

We believe that we can be profitable or at break even by the end of the current fiscal year, assuming sufficient sales. Based upon our current plans, we have adjusted our operating expenses so that cash generated from operations and from working capital financing is expected to be sufficient for the foreseeable future to fund our operations at our currently forecasted levels. To try to operate at a break-even level based upon our current level of anticipated business activity, we believe that we must generate approximately $35,000 in revenue per year. However, if our forecasts are inaccurate, we may need to raise additional funds. Our resources consist of our available cash and advances from Mr. West, who has agreed to loan such funds as may be necessary through December 31, 2008 for working capital purposes. On the other hand, we may choose to scale back our operations to operate at break-even with a smaller level of business activity, while adjusting our overhead to meet the revenue from current operations. In addition, we expect that we will need to raise additional funds if we decide to pursue more rapid expansion, the development of new or enhanced services or products, appropriate responses to competitive pressures, or the acquisition of complementary businesses or technologies, or if we must respond to unanticipated events that require us to make additional investments. We cannot assure that additional financing will be available when needed on favorable terms, or at all.

We expect to incur operating losses in future periods because we will be incurring expenses and not generating sufficient revenues. We expect approximately $35,000 in operating costs over the next twelve months. We cannot guarantee that we will be successful in generating sufficient revenues or other funds in the future to cover these operating costs. Failure to generate sufficient revenues or additional financing when needed could cause us to go out of business
 
Other than advances from Mr. West, who has agreed to loan such funds as may be necessary through December 31, 2008 for working capital purposes, there is no assurance that additional funds will be made available to us on terms that will be acceptable, or at all, if and when needed. We expect to generate and increase sales, but there can be no assurance we will generate sales sufficient to continue operations or to expand.

We also are planning to rely on the possibility of referrals from clients and will strive to satisfy our clients. We believe that referrals will be an effective form of advertising because of the quality of service that we bring to clients. We believe that satisfied clients will bring more and repeat clients.

In the next 12 months, we do not intend to spend any material funds on research and development and do not intend to purchase any large equipment.

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements.

We do not expect the adoption of any recently issued accounting pronouncements to have a significant impact on our net results of operations, financial position, or cash flows.

 
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Seasonality.

We do not expect our revenues to be impacted by seasonal demands for our services.

ITEM 3.  CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

As of the end of the period covered by this report, based on an evaluation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a -15(e) and 15(d)-15(e) under the Exchange Act), our Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer has concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures are effective to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in our Exchange Act reports is recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within the applicable time periods specified by the SEC’s rules and forms.

There were no changes in our internal controls over financial reporting that occurred during our most recent fiscal quarter that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

PART II.  OTHER INFORMATION

ITEM 1.  LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

There are no legal proceedings, to which we are a party, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or operating results.

ITEM 2.  CHANGES IN SECURITIES
None

ITEM 3.  DEFAULTS UPON SENIOR SECURITIES
None

ITEM 4.  SUBMISSION OF MATTERS TO A VOTE OF SECURITY HOLDERS
None

ITEM 5.  OTHER INFORMATION

              None

ITEM 6.  EXHIBITS AND REPORTS ON FORM 8-K

Exhibit No.
                        Description
  3.1*
Articles of Incorporation of Medical Billing Assistance, Inc.
  3.2*
Bylaws of Medical Billing Assistance, Inc.
21.1*
List of Subsidiaries
31.1
Certification of CEO/CFO pursuant to Sec. 302
32.1
Certification of CEO/CFO pursuant to Sec. 906
           
    * Previously filed with Form SB-2 Registration Statement, December 20, 2007.

 
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Reports on Form 8-K

We filed no under cover of Form 8K for the fiscal quarter ended March 31, 2008.


SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized on May 13, 2008.


   
Medical Billing Assistance, Inc.
 
 
By: 
/s/  Michael West
   
Michael West , President and Chief Executive and Financial Officer

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